Faith Students 2.15

For a child has been born – for us! The gift of a son – for us! He’ll take over the running of the world. His names will be Amazing Counselor, Strong God, Eternal Father, Prince of Wholeness. His ruling authority will grow, and there’ll be no limits to the wholeness he brings. Isaiah 9:6-7 msg

Like many of you (maybe all of you) I do love Christmas, but I struggle around this time to miss the season in the midst of all the doing. It’s not like I can blame Christmas for what it has become, but in the efforts to squeeze the most out of this holiday season we sometimes miss the two things that we are to focus on AWE and WONDER!

I contend that Awe and Wonder are the two most important ingredients we bring to the Christmas season. Being in Awe of the gift of Christ is what we are longing for and it is what we want our students to have. if we live in wonder of how  this story brings us together, we can share the message of Christ with others!

It amazes me that almost everything we do during this season works to pull us away from the AWE and WONDER of Christ. Think about it;

  • Busyness
  • Worry
  • Obligations
  • Financial Expectations

Almost everything we run around doing is not what we are supposed to be doing, so how do we change it. I encourage you to read a verse in the morning to your whole family. Here is a list of great verses that will put the emphasis on what we are supposed to be focused on.

Isaiah 9:6,  Jonah 2:7,  Hosea 6:6,  John 1:12,  Col 1:19, 2:9,  Eph 4:7,  Isa 40:28-31,  Ps 73:28

Talk to your students about making an attitude shift. in our home We are doing a secret Santa gift exchange with our kids, but we are asking that the focus not be on a present, but to bless that person for the next two weeks. Make their bed for them, give them some of your cookie (that is massive!), do a chore for them. Look to bless them and make the gift be an outpour of a loving heart.

Take control and ownership this season in all the ways you can.

Thank you for letting me minister to your students and alongside them in reaching their friends, our community and the world for His glory.

Scott Owens


Dig and Release
weekly info: Every Sunday during the 2nd service we have Dig and Release for all students 7th-12th grade. We are Digging this Sunday (Dec 16th) at East.  There will be NO Dig and Release Dec 23rd and 30th.

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Faith Students 2.14

You shall teach them diligently to your children, and shall talk of them when you sit in your house, and when you walk by the way, and when you lie down, and when you rise. Deuteronomy 6:7 esv

For the last couple of weeks I shared the first two parts of a three-part series from a conversation I had with world-class principal, education communicator and drumming-savant Jessica Cabeen about transition stages for our students and wanted to share notes from that conversation with you for the next couple of weeks.

She gave me three MASSIVE points

  1. Build Empathy
  2. Encouraging Healthy Peer Connections
  3. Build a Successful Adults

Building into your student so they are a successful adult is nothing new, but the second question needs to be, what is our definition of success? That may seem easy, but look at your own life and what you quantify as success and that will most likely be the definition you convey to your students.

Security in finances, ability to retire early, being at the top of your field, living a better life than your parents, and taking larger vacations are all financial success goals. Having a large family, better relationship with my kids then my parents have with me, and never getting divorced are all family success goals. Giving your students an awe of God, having your kids be in a church as an adult, all of your kids baptized in a church, and your kids memorizing John 3:16 are all faith success goals. SO, what is the best way to figure out how to build success into your future adult? Do you pick one goal from each area (Finances, Family, Faith) does that mean you are building a successful adult?

Remember the story of Zacchaeus, He was a wee little man and a wee little man was he (kind of redundant, but memorable). Chief tax collector was his title so that meant he had financial success completed. He had Jesus and his disciples and probably close to a mob in his house and so we can assume being a jew that he had a family and yet he is willing to give away money if he defrauded anyone (Luke 19:8). Question: If Zacchaeus’ parents were there what do you think they would have said?

Possibilities:

  1. What are you doing? Don’t do that you are giving away the money you earned with hard work!
  2. Son, what a giving man you are! Good job!

Nothing is wrong with wanting your child to be successful in career and finances so that they can willing and joyfully bless others, NOTHING IS WRONG WITH THAT. But the line between showing our students success (in the world’s eyes) and success (in God’s eyes) is complicated. Because it is drastically different and also very easy to get wrong.

My goal in this newsletter is not to make you feel shame, but to ask you all one question: if you were Zacchaeus’ parents what would you say, and does this show what your view of success is to your own students?

Thank you for letting me minister to your students and alongside them in reaching their friends, our community and the world for His glory.

Scott Owens

Dig and Release weekly info: Every Sunday during the 2nd service we have Dig and Release for all students 7th-12th grade. We are Releasing this Sunday (Dec 9th) in Room 105 and then Digging next Sunday (Dec 16th) at East.  There is no Dig and Release December 23 and 30.

 

Links

  • Facebook page: facebook.com/FaithChurchStudents
  • Instagram page: instagram.com/FCStudentMin
  • Twitter page: twitter.com/FCStudentMin

 

Upcoming Events

CHRISTMAS PARTY

  • Wednesday Dec 12th  6:30pm  Wear your ugliest Christmas sweater for the Ugly Sweater Scholarship Pageant

NO WNL

  • Dec 19 and 26

SMALL GROUP NIGHT

  • January 2nd

Faith Students 2.13

You shall teach them diligently to your children, and shall talk of them when you sit in your house, and when you walk by the way, and when you lie down, and when you rise. Deuteronomy 6:7 esv

Last week I shared the first part of a three-part series from a conversation I had with world-class principal, education communicator and drumming-savant Jessica Cabeen about transition stages for our students.  I will be sharing notes from that conversation with you for the next couple of weeks.

She gave me three MASSIVE points

  1. Build Empathy
  2. Encouraging Healthy Peer Connections
  3. Build a Successful Adult

Last week I shared about the necessity in building empathy in students. This week I want to share with you about the necessity in encouraging healthy peer connections for your students. One of the first steps is allowing your students to have time in their day/schedule so that they can have connections with other students.

I recently learned from a message by Michael Anderson, author of a great book Gist, that the average teenage student today has the same pressure and stress as a 1950’s schizophrenic patient. Now just to be clear, the definition of a schizophrenia is a long-term mental disorder involving breakdowns in the relation between thought, emotion, and behavior leading to mental fragmentation.

Two reactions:

  1. Wow! Really?
  2. I can see some of those traits in students today!

Students either run from this to that doing fourteen different things or they don’t know how to deal with the limited things they are doing because of a lack of time management. Just like it is the responsibility of the church today to speak truth in our culture, it is the responsibility of parents to give their children the correct instruction on healthy connections for their sake and for future relationships.

Opening up time for your students to spend time with others that have an accurate view of what gives them worth and value and/or just the correct influences is our responsibility. I encourage you to take a moment and look at your students schedule and where are the stresses and pressures coming from? Does there need to be more instruction and help you can provide them about balance and worth? Will the relationships they have lead them to see themselves as Christ sees them or will it give them a false perspective on their value? I pray this helps you to step into moments of transition with joy and not with fear.

‘know that the Lord, he is God! It is he who made us, and we are his; we are his people, and the sheep of his pasture.’– Psalm 100:3

Thank you for letting me minister to your students and alongside them in reaching their friends, our community and the world for His glory.

Scott Owens


Dig and Release
weekly info: Every Sunday during the 2nd service we have Dig and Release for all students 7th-12th grade. We are Digging this Sunday (Dec 2nd) at East and then Releasing next Sunday (Dec 9th) in Room 105.

Faith Students 2.12

You shall teach them diligently to your children, and shall talk of them when you sit in your house, and when you walk by the way, and when you lie down, and when you rise. Deuteronomy 6:7 esv

 I had a conversation this summer with world-class principal, education communicator and drumming-savant, Jessica Cabeen, about transition stages for our children and wanted to share notes from that conversation with you for this week’s newsletter.

recently I have noticed a strong Christian response of fear when it comes to our students transitioning into the next phase of life. Whether that is moving up a grade, transition of different churches or different schools, moving neighborhoods or losing a friend – we see students struggling to adjust and trust in Christ. So, my conversation with Jessica started with one question. “How does our church step into gaps to prepare parents for the next phase for their kids?’

She gave me three points

  1. Build Empathy
  2. Encouraging Healthy Peer Connections
  3. Build a Successful Adult

I want to focus on the first of these three points this week, how do we build empathy in our students. This is the season when focusing on serving others seems to be all around us, but letting students serve doesn’t mean you build empathy in the same way that owning a boat doesn’t make you a pirate.

Often when encouraging others to serve the task of laying out the big picture gets missed.

Why are we doing this?
Why does this matter to those we are serving?
How is Christ glorified in this?

I encourage you to serve as a family this season and when you do to ask questions of your students and encourage them to make sure they know the big reason of why we are serving.

‘By this we know love, that he laid down his life for us, and we ought to lay down our lives for the brothers. But if anyone has the world’s goods and sees his brother in need, yet closes his heart against him, how does God’s love abide in him? Little children, let us not love in word or talk but in deed and in truth.’ 1 John 3:16-18

Thank you for letting me minister to your students and alongside them in reaching their friends, our community and the world for His glory.

Scott Owens

Dig and Release weekly info: Every Sunday during the 2nd service we have Dig and Release for all students 7th-12th grade. We are Releasing this Sunday on Nov 25th at Room 105 and Digging again on Dec 2nd.

UPCOMING EVENTS

NO WNL ON NOV 21ST

CHRISTMAS IN THE S.W.

  • Nov 29th  4-7pm at the Main Building
    Live Nativity, Campfire Donuts and Hot Chocolate
    Volunteers needed.  Contact Scott at 437-1000

CHRISTMAS PARTY

  • Dec 12th  6:30pm East Building
    Ugly Sweater contest
    Cookies, games and story from Grandma Josie

Faith Students 2.11

For if these qualities are yours and are increasing, they keep you from being ineffective or unfruitful in the knowledge of our Lord Jesus Christ. 2 Peter 1:8 esv

“Of course I parent the correct way otherwise I would change it!” I said to a person in our church. Let me be clear, I don’t think I am the perfect parent (none of us do), however we should believe that we are doing it correctly otherwise wouldn’t you want to change how you parent for the sake of your children?

If I was the coach of the Minnesota Vikings and I came up with a plan to take down the Chicago bears in a week, but yet I knew it wasn’t going to work would that make me a bad coach? Maybe… maybe they are just that much more superior then we are (totally hypothetical cause Diggs and Thielen are Bear killers). or would that cause me to change to a better plan so that we could win… YES! That is what would make me a good coach.

If you, as a parent, know you are not teaching your children in the correct way then why wouldn’t you change it? You absolutely would. all of us should believe we are teaching our children the correct way, because why else would we be still doing it? are you parenting correctly?

Coming up this Sunday, November 18th we are having a ParentLab about what is your end game in parenting. It is about writing your family mission statement and making it the focus of what you want your family to be about.

What is the mission of your family?
What do you desire for your children to be in Christ?
What are the non-negotiable purposes moving forward?

We are not wanting to dictate these to you, but instead we want to have a conversation about what it should be for different families. If you have never come to a ParentLab then please consider attending this one. If this seems interesting and you know another couple or parent that would like to be part of this discussion by all means bring them too.   We want to equip you, resource you or help coach you in parenting with confidence in Christ so that you see the blessing from God in His calling for you.

Thank you for letting me minister to your students and alongside them in reaching their friends, our community and the world for His glory.

Scott Owens


Dig and Release
weekly info: Every Sunday during the second service KidVenture time only we have Dig and Release for all students 7th-12th grade. We are Digging this Sunday (Nov 18), meaning we will be prepping in Room 101 (new location). After that, we are Releasing on Nov 25th at Room 105 and then Digging again on Dec 2nd

 

Upcoming Events

NORTHWESTERN @ WNL

  • Nov 14

DINNER NIGHT WITH GRANDMA JOSIE

  • Nov 14 @ 6pm  East Building  Dessert Dinner

NO WNL ON NOV 21ST

Faith Students 2.10

Nathanael exclaimed, “Rabbi! You are the Son of God, the King of Israel!” Jesus said, “You’ve become a believer simply because I say I saw you one day sitting under the fig tree? You haven’t seen anything yet!” John 1:49-50 esv

 I love this interaction between Nathanael and Jesus because it causes me to wonder what the look on Jesus’ face was. I know we don’t get the facial reaction in the notes from this exchange, but Jesus’ words do lead us to get an idea of what His look was like. Nathanael was most likely in a moment of prayer and questioning of God. Nathanael was most likely asking when was the redeemer, ‘christ’ going to come and Nathanael was having a frank conversation with the creator of the universe.

Jesus knows this moment because he is God and he uses this in his ‘recruitment speech’ (it’s a short speech because Jesus is just that good at recruiting). HOWEVER, asking the tough question or not-beating-around-the-bush is a tactic that needs to be used from time to time. When it comes to your students and challenging where their faith is at in an encouraging way do you change your tactics?

I admit that when I parent my children it looks different based on the kid, especially the boys versus the girls. I am gentler with my girls and I expect more from my boys. I tell my girls I love them and I tell my boys I am proud of them. A wise man once told me, ‘Your boys will make you proud and your girls will melt your heart’! At least from my perspective it is true. There have been times when I raise my voice and they know they are in trouble and ‘snap to attention’ a little more than usual. SO, what I have started doing is raise my voice to tell them how proud I am of them or how much I love them. “MATHIAS!!! I am sooo proud of you…”

Yesterday in church Mike talked about Hebrews 10:19-25. “Let us consider how to stir up one another to love and good works. (v. 24)” This verse challenged me! Do I consider (spend time thinking about) how to stir up others? Do I spend time in thought…in prayer…

I am committed to do a better job of taking moments before a meeting, before a counseling appointment, before meeting with a student, before time with my children, before time with my wife to ‘consider how to stir up’ them. Not just in thought, but in prayer…because if I don’t spend time in thought about how I need to challenge or ‘stir up’ someone then for sure I am not spending time in prayer. That prayer is also most likely one-sided. I’m not listening to God for what I need to say if I am squeezing in a short prayer. I am committed to change that in my life, to not let my busyness effect my ability to ‘stir up’ others.

SO, I have some questions for you:

  • Do you ‘stir up’ others?
  • Do you desire to be known as someone that ‘stirs up’ others to love and good works?
  • What would happen if you took time to listen to God for what to say to just your family and just challenge your students to do the same, how would life change?

Thank you for letting me minister to your students and alongside them in reaching their friends, our community and the world for His glory.

Scott Owens

 

Dig and Release weekly info: Every Sunday during the second service KidVenture time only we have Dig and Release for all students 7th-12th grade. We are Releasing this Sunday (Nov 11), meaning we will be teaching in Room 105. After that, we are Digging on Nov 18th at Room 101 (new location) and then Releasing again on Nov 25th.

 

Links

  • Facebook page: facebook.com/FaithChurchStudents
  • Instagram page: instagram.com/FCStudentMin
  • Email: students@faithchurchaustin.org

 

Upcoming Events

NORTHWESTERN @ WNL

  • Nov 14th  Students from Northwestern College in St Paul will lead WNL with great music, games and message

DINNER NIGHT WITH GRANDMA JOSIE

  • Nov 14th  Dessert Dinner with Grandma Josie.  It’s going to be delicious.  This is a date change from Nov 7th  6pm at East

NO WNL ON NOV 21ST

  • Thanksgiving break.

Faith Students 2.9

We just had an amazing weekend at Camp Shamineau and Fall Fling.  Here is an article from Jaquelle Crowe.  I think you will find some great nuggets in here.

Teach Teens Discernment

Killing houseplants runs in my family. My mom is the master plant murderer, at least when she’s indoors. Give her a garden outside and plants have a 99 percent better rate of survival. When we lived in British Columbia she had quite a thriving garden in our backyard. She even grew pumpkins one year. But put the lady in charge of a pot on the kitchen windowsill, and it’s planticide.

I recently discovered she’s passed along this evil power to me. Last month I dog-sat for my grandparents, and Grandpa left me a list of instructions for Kit, his puppy. “Oh yeah,” he added as an afterthought, “and maybe you could keep an eye on that plant while you’re here.” They came home three weeks later to a happy, healthy Kit. I had fed her full, kept her water bowl brimming, taken her on long walks, and provided heaps of treats and attention. The plant, on the other hand, was on death’s doorstep.

I tell you about this like it’s some sort of magical power Mom and I have. Like we do everything we can to keep a plant alive—give it sunlight, water it daily, mash in some Miracle-Gro, sing to it—and yet it somehow mysteriously still dies. But the truth is we don’t do all that. The plant dies because we’re inattentive. We just don’t care about its health and growth, and so we forget to put in the persistent hard work of tending it.

Caring for plants reminds me that growth takes a lot of work. But growth is also a necessary survival mechanism for all living things. If a flower grows, it’s alive. If it stops (or never starts), it withers and dies. That’s basic biology.

The same is true for Christians. When the gospel saved us, it made us alive in Christ, breathing life into our dead hearts (Col. 2:13). We became wide awake and hungry spiritual newborns, thirsty sprouts, with eyes freshly opened to the world. And immediately, we started growing.

But we cannot grow without discernment. The two are inextricably bound together.

And that’s why teenagers need discernment.

How to Explain Discernment to Teens

Discernment is simply the ability to define and act upon the difference between right and wrong, or, as Charles Spurgeon said, between “right and almost right.” It’s looking out over the landscape of your life; examining everything you encounter; and judging between good and bad, between biblical and false doctrine, between edifying and harmful entertainment, between holiness and sin. In 1 Thessalonians 5:21, we’re told to “test everything; hold fast what is good.” Growth and discernment are like a self-feeding cycle, a precious circle. Where there is spiritual growth, there will be spiritual discernment.

Yet discernment isn’t a sort of hyper-criticism that turns you into an embittered watchdog sniffing out others’ mistakes. Instead it’s a holy call to discern what is pleasing to God and what is not (Rom. 12:1–2). It frees you to relish what’s beautiful and true, and to reject what’s ugly and false. Discernment equals growth.

How to Help Teens Pursue Discernment

In Ephesians 4, Paul connects growth and discernment for the church in Ephesus. As Christians learn from godly teachers, we will “grow up” in Christ and become less and less like undiscerning children “tossed to and fro by the waves and carried about by every wind of doctrine, by human cunning, by craftiness in deceitful schemes” (v. 14). Instead, as we increase in maturity and wisdom, we will increase in discernment too. And as we do that, we “grow up in every way into him who is the head, into Christ” (v. 15).

So if discernment is needed to spiritually grow up, how do teens get it? Ultimately, like everything else good in our lives, God is the giver (Dan. 2:21). His Spirit works in our hearts to effect lasting change. But he’s also given us the responsibility to seek and find and teach discernment. As Paul exhorts, “Try to discern what is pleasing to the Lord” (Eph. 5:10).

There are two big ways we do that—two things to teach your teens.

  1. Teach them to go to God’s Word.

God is the rock solid foundation of discernment, so what better place to look for it than in his Word? Proverbs 2 says that if we receive and study and love God’s true words, he will give discernment. When we set our minds on the things of God, we immerse ourselves in what’s right and, in the process, we protect ourselves from deception (Matt. 16:23).

God has written down his truth in Scripture, and we have unlimited access to it. By studying it, we’re able to use it as an objective standard and measuring stick to evaluate the teaching we encounter. If you want more discernment, read the Bible. If you want your teens to grow, teach them to read it.

  1. Teach them to ask God for discernment.

The second way to gain discernment seems both childishly simple and tiredly cliché—pray. But since God is the One who gives discernment, we should ask for it. That’s what Solomon did when he became Israel’s king. God appeared to him in a dream and said, “Ask what I shall give you” (1 Kings 3:5). It was an unqualified invitation.

Solomon replied with great humility:

O LORD my God, you have made your servant king in place of David my father, although I am but a little child. I do not know how to go out or come in. And your servant is in the midst of your people whom you have chosen, a great people, too many to be numbered or counted for multitude. Give your servant therefore an understanding mind to govern your people, that I may discern between good and evil, for who is able to govern this your great people? (1 Kings 3:7–9)

He was a brand-new king. He could have asked for political power, victory in battle, popularity, fame, or unfailing success. Instead, he asked for the most valuable thing he knew of—discernment. Teach your teens to take a page out of Solomon’s playbook and humbly and earnestly ask the Lord to give them discernment. “If any of you lacks wisdom,” James writes, “let him ask God, who gives generously to all without reproach, and it will be given him” (James 1:5).

God is the source of truth, so if your teens want to know what is right and best, send them to him. Encourage them to express their desire to obey him through discernment, and ask him to mature them in this area.

No In-Between

As Jesus followers, our entire lives are different because of what God says is true and what he says is false. Discernment and growth walk hand in hand. Like houseplants, we grow up and we live, or we don’t. There’s no in-between.

Discernment changes everything.

Thank you for letting me minister to your students and alongside them in reaching their friends, our community and the world for His glory.

Scott Owens

 

This article is an excerpt from Jaquelle’s book newest book This Changes Everything: How the Gospel Transforms the Teen Years (Crossway, 2017).  It would be a great resource for you.

Faith Students 2.8

“I acknowledged my sin to you, and I did not cover my iniquity; I said, ‘I will confess my transgressions to the Lord,’ and you forgave the iniquity of my sin.” Psalm 32:5 ESV

How do you create a culture in your family that struggling is okay, but stumbling and falling without communicating to people that love you is not okay? How do you communicate that in your family it is okay to go through the difficulties of life, but as a family we don’t go through them in silence? Or do you not agree with me that struggling can have benefits.

We all sin and we all stumble and fall, but how do you know when you doing this in isolation without others to help you through. Alcoholics Anonymous have 12 steps to recovery and step five applies to all of us, ‘admit to God, to ourselves, and to another human being the exact nature of our wrongs’. There is a necessity in faith to making sure we don’t climb every mountain without those that love us and also without Him.

Jesus talks clearly about the necessity of coming for the sick and not the healthy (Mt 9:12-13) and also that he came to ‘seek and save the lost’ (Lk 19:10). Yet we desire to project this facade that we have everything all together, under control and we are not in need. Does this help our students and their dependency on Christ?

‘Blessed is the one whose transgression is FORGIVEN; whose sin is covered.’ (ps 32:1)

SO, walk this logic out with me: If I don’t confess my struggles and acknowledge my struggles (to Him or others) then I am not in need. I don’t show a need in my life, then I am not in need of a savior because I don’t need saving. Therefore, I don’t have to confess anything to the savior and walk around without a need to be forgiven so I am in essence not blessed in my humility according to Psalm 32.

SO, I circle to my original question, how do you create a culture in your family that struggling is okay, but stumbling and falling without communicating to people that love you is not okay? One of the biggest struggles and desires in ministry I have is a desire for students to be more honest with parents, friends, adults and people that care about their struggles and desires to need Him. Yet I know where they get this callous nature…US!

Thank you for letting me minister to your students and alongside them in reaching their friends, our community and the world for His glory.

Scott Owens

 

DIG & RELEASE weekly info: Every Sunday during the second service KidVenture time only we have Dig and Release for all students 7th-12th grade. We are Releasing this Sunday (Oct 28), meaning we will be teaching in Room 105. After that Digging on Nov 4th East and then Releasing again on Nov 11th.

FALL FLING @ SHAMINEAU
We leave this Friday.  Turn in your completed forms to either the office or WNL.  NO ONE can go if forms are NOT filled out completely and returned.

GIVE AND TREAT @ WNL
Bring NEW socks, pj’s or underwear in sizes 0-5T to WNL on Oct 31st.  Donations will be given to Mower County Social Services to benefit children in our community during a time of need.     Treats to those who bring in 3 or more packages and to the one who brings in the most donations.

NORTHWESTERN @ WNL
Northwestern College will be visiting and leading WNL on November 14th.  This is always a great night at WNL.

Faith Students 2.7

“For you shall see the land before you, but you shall not go there, into the land that I am giving to the people of Israel.” Deuteronomy 32:52 ESV

I had a mentor in student ministry and he told me once ‘don’t go into ministry to help people that are hurting, it won’t end well.’ That was his advice.

We all know hurting people and when I talk about hurting people you may have an image or name that comes to your mind. Let’s be honest all or most of us do! We should know hurting people and having people around us that are hurt is where we need to be. ‘those who are well have no need of a physician, but those who are sick’ (Lk 5:31).

However, we don’t need all the hurting people in our lives, but the ones that God has called us too. There are some people put in your lives that you can help, but there are some people that we cannot help. That is because only God can heal some people.

SO, who is God calling you to help?

Who are the hurting people in your life that God has continually left there so that you could share the love and forgiveness of Christ with?

My mentor said to me ‘don’t go into ministry to help people that are hurting, it won’t end well, instead go into ministry to understand why people hurt and help them see Christ.’ Valuable insight from a man that regularly let students shave his head.

This year we are blessed in many ways:

  1. I have 18 amazing Alongsiders that love the students compassionately
  2. We are seeing new students come every week
  3. We have some amazingly gifted seniors and juniors that want to step up and show their faith to other students
  4. We have hurting students that God has brought to us because He finds us worthy to have them.

Every student we have is a chance to share the love of Christ and so please pray for us this year that we can share that love to the students that are passionately running after Christ and for the students that want to run after Him, but are scared to death to do it.

Thank you for letting me minister to your students and alongside them in reaching their friends, our community and the world for His glory.

Scott Owens

 

Dig and Release weekly info: Every Sunday during the second service KidVenture time only we have Dig and Release for all students 7th-12th grade. We are Digging this week (Oct 21st), meaning we will be at East during KidVenture. After that Releasing on Oct 28th in Room 105 and then Digging again on Nov 4th at East.

How To Stay Connected
web: http://www.faithchurchaustin.org/students
email: students@faithchurchaustin.org
facebook: facebook.com/FaithChurchStudents
twitter: twitter.com/FCStudentMin
instagram: instagram.com/FCStudentMin

Faith Students 2.6

“in order to make sure I was not running or had not run in vain.” Galatians 2:2b ESV

This week we are talking about using a map or directions to know where we are going and I am in need of your help. Let’s be honest, the best part about reading directions is getting there in one peace and knowing that you read the map correctly or that the person that gave you directions was not lost themselves.

Another fun thing about reading maps or directions is when it goes wonderfully horribly wrong. Every single one of us has a bad story or a funny story about when we got lost. Many TIMES, in our faith, we get lost and it is not that funny. We struggle to know where our next checkpoint is or where we need to change direction, or where the next milestone moment may come.

We run the races in our faith sometimes for the Holy Spirit to show us how far we can go, or to run the races with others for the benefit of others. When we are in a group of believers and followers of Christ it is amazing how our faith is sharpened and energized by the encouragement of others. It also keeps us running!

So, why do you run the race of your faith?

Do you run for others (your kids and family), for Him (Father in heaven), out of habit, to be thought of highly by others, out of passion, for freedom (away from the life of sin)? No matter what, we want to run the race not in vain as Paul is referring to the church in Galatia. That is why having a map is so important, having directions is key. We get that from God’s Word, we get help from others. Every one of us needs a map, needs directions because we are all prone to get lost and have a horrible story.

this week we are going to talk about a map, directions, GPS and you can help. If you have time and are willing please share a story with me about getting lost that went horribly bad. I would like to read many of those on Wednesday Night as an illustration. You don’t have to have names or embarrassing facts, just share the worst/funniest story you got. You can do this over email, scott@faithchurchaustin.org or call and leave a message, 218.251.1990.

Thank you for letting me minister to your students and alongside them in reaching their friends, our community and the world for His glory.

Scott Owens